Vintage signage

Posted: June 14, 2009 in creativity
Tags:

belair

I haven’t seen them for yonks: enamel signs. In Germany I’m sure all road signs were made that way, but what’ really stood out were small advertising signs, and that would have been even more the case in the heartland of capitalism, the United States of America. I’m absolutely no fan of the brainwashing lies used by the advertising industry, but in hindsight the message delivery of those ad signs looks quite benign and romantic compared to the brutally subtle manipulation unleashed on us today via the electronic media. SmashingMagazine, from which these 2 examples were taken, has collected 60 of these vintage signage pieces and also gives a brief background on them:

In the U.S., most outdoor signs made between 1890 and and 1950 were constructed of a base of heavy rolled iron, which was die cut into the desired shape, then coated with layers of colored powdered glass and fired in a kiln. This process made them durable and weather-resistant. Signs made this way were known as porcelain enamel signs or simply enamel signs.

Porcelain enamel signs originated in Germany and were imported into the U.S. They quickly became a staple of outdoor advertising across the country. Around 1900, designers experimented with bold colors and graphics on the signs and they were used to advertise everything from cigarettes and beer to farm equipment and tires. Early designs were stenciled, but American designers switched to silkscreens and started using a steel base instead of iron. Later, when porcelain enamel became too costly, tin bases were used instead of steel.

Now it is difficult to find antique porcelain enamel signs in excellent condition. Collectors pay hundreds and even thousands of dollars for each addition to their collections. Many of the signs were vandalized, discarded due to etching or crazing in the finish or melted down for the metal during World War II. After the war, the signs were too expensive to manufacture, so we are left with only the dazzling pieces that remain from the era.

Signs were later made of tin and other materials and painted with enamel paint. More of these types of signs remain, but they are often rusted, scratched and distressed. After WWII, “enamel” signs were simply enamel paint on a metal, usually tin, base.

There is a huge market for vintage signs and collectors must be wary of distressed reproductions. Often vintage signs are stamped with the date they were manufactured, while other times research and knowledge about antique signs may be required to discern a real antique from a knockoff.

cocacola

Check out SmashingMagazine for 58 more vintage signs.

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